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Defining Presence. . .

Posted on Jul 4, 2017 by | 0 comments

In Buddhism we hear of, speak about and practice the concept of presence; but just how can we define something so seemingly fleeting and intangible?

The trouble is in how we decide to measure The Present. Modern time has us slicing ‘the moment’ into the infinitesimal units of time called seconds. But how can you live in the moment if the moment changes every second?

We actually believe that every moment is a ‘new’ moment because it can be measured by a machine, which leaves us forming expectations for our organic lives that are machine like. We get upset when our computers don’t process fast enough and when we don’t process things as fast as a computer. In fact this almost hidden social norm has for the majority become the baseline for intelligence and productivity and thus we set ourselves up for constant disappointment.

Ever wonder why, after looking at a clock your whole life you don’t just know what time it is automatically, naturally? It’s because there isn’t anything more unnatural than a ticking clock, except for measuring every aspect of your life – when to get up, how long to be up, how far to go, when to eat, sleep, you name it; we measure it – by time. . .

It’s about time for an update. We need a 21st century clock that helps us be more present, more often. A clock that points to pace of growth found in nature not on circuit board or clock.I will end this post with this quote – In the stillness of your presence, you can feel your own formless and timeless reality as the unmanifested life that animates your physical form. You can then feel the same life deep within every other human and every other creature. You look beyond the veil of form and separation. This is the realization of oneness. This is the presence of love. – Eckhart Tolle

Peace and Love, Jim

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